A Fall From Grace – Pull Your Pants Up

by / 20 Comments / 214 View / October 31, 2014

How do we experience liberation?  For some it is found in an outright betrayal of societal norms.  Sagging pants, overt undergarments, casually thrown cuss words were once considered “sticking it to the man,” but when all but a select minority are behaving in such a fashion is this really a sign of individual rebellion?  Has it become a group effort, a cult following, or rather has it lost all meaning?  Has it become the norm?  

I often find myself longing for the more refined aspects of the past, a time when ladies were ladies and gentleman true gentleman.  It is obvious that certain immaturity will be found at the High School level, but in modern day society the so called “childish nature,” of many antics follow both boys and girls into adulthood.  Both dress and language in my opinion have taken a dismal turn.  I am in no way an anti-feminist and believe that women should wear dresses to their ankles and cover their faces in modesty, allow men to carry conversation, and direct their daily lives – rather I believe that both males and females should equally be held to a higher code of ethics.   

On a daily basis, the encroaching force of seductive dress in an overly sexualized society and the increasingly coarse nature of the English language are seen.  Girls wear crop tops and skintight leggings in the dead of winter; despite temperature discomfort they are slaves to their own personal rebellion.  These outfits leave little to the imagination.  What do they hope to convey – that they are their own person?  If this is their purpose, they are terrible misguided.  Instead they project an image of insecurity and desperation for acceptance in any form.  Equally at fault are their male counterparts, gone with manly chivalry and the philosophy of “dress for success,” many look as if they are either ready for bed or have only bothered to get half dressed.  What does this speak of America’s youth and future?  It speaks volumes, depicting simply a generation of people unconcerned with little but themselves and primal petty desires.      

It terms of language decay it is the greater of the two evils.  I love sophisticated conversation.  When a friend seamlessly slips a higher-level term into everyday conversation, makes a reference of intellect it both impresses me and endears me.  When a friend uses the f-bomb as an exclamatory phrase for no apparent reason, it silently pains me.  This use loose of coarse language, improper grammar and profanities has become such an epidemic at the High School level that it is no longer corrected.  My ears still pick-up on these phrases with distaste but have become partly desensitized.  What is startling and equally troubling is that is seems that the newer waves of students have regressed even greater in their language abilities.  Often overhearing the conversation of seventh or eighth grade boys I come away with no knowledge as to the content of their discussion.  Their erratic use of profanities, abysmal grammar, and spotty pronunciation leaves me regarding them as barbarians.  Maybe it is wrong to make judgment on their way of speech, they might be lovely people, but their mouths certainly aren’t and are desperate need of a good washing.       

It seems as if the conditions of normality are slipping.  In ten years will the greater percent of the student body arrive to school in tank tops and pajama pants, hair mussed and curse words dribbling from their puckered lips?  It is a personal battle we face each day, to skip out and accept the changing if not degrading social norms or to withstand them in the protection of greater self-courtesy?  Next time you unknowingly drop the f-bomb in class, do yourself a favor and take a moment to consider how many of your classmates are silently judging you.  And while you’re at it, pull your pants up too.  

  • Lol WUT

    Haha, fuck this.

  • Halifax Steppenwulf

    This doesn’t seem so much as a well-substantiated arguement, as a prude complaining that someone said a naughty word and that a girl had the audacity to wear something that’s both comfortable and very appealing to the opposite sex (or the same, no judgements here).

    • Bacchanal F

      Sometimes I wear tank-tops to class. I hope my professors don’t think I’m immodest because my shoulders are uncovered! :O

      • Lapria

        Only if your professors are conservative upper class republicans!

      • Halifax Steppenwulf

        Clearly you aren’t a “real lady” at all! If I had to guess, you probably also kiss Billy Stevenson when he takes you on rides in his car, you little hussie.

  • Bacchanal F

    This statements that Aburi Juhasz makes here are so flippant it’s sad. The comments made in the article are racist and classist and sexist microagressions. The author wants people to “pull up their pants”? Well let us think about this for a second. Who is usually told to pull up their pants? African American youth and young adults. In saying that the style of dress is unacceptable and that it’s a “fall from grace” the author overlooks the long history(and current state) of african americans, and ultimately makes a value judgement on black inner-city teenagers for not following the white, modest, middle-class way of dressing.

    Additionally: “Girls wear crop tops and skintight leggings in the dead of winter; despite temperature discomfort they are slaves to their own personal rebellion. These outfits leave little to the imagination. What do they hope to convey – that they are their own person?” The author attends Barnard, a women’s college. What is she there for? Who is the author to make value judgments on the the dress of other people? Why denigrate the fashion choices of women, and ultimately, your peers?

    This “higher code of ethics” that the author ultimately speaks to is not the “higher code”. It is the code of the White uppity-upper class, who look down upon everyone who does not dress to conservative standards. Following this higher code of ethics is a way of distancing oneself from the multiplicities of identities and cultures in America. Instead of telling people to pull their pants up, why don’t you spend some time examining the reasons why you think you are justified in making value judgments on the culture of other groups of people?

    This is a ridiculous article, and if I didn’t already have experience with privileged people who were unaware of their privilege, I would posit that it’s satire. But unfortunately, this doesn’t seem like a satirical article.

    • Lapria

      I wonder if the author has ever had a black friend, or has ever spent time in an economically depressed area of the country?

      This article reads like the beginning of a racist and classist manifesto. TODAY’S YOUTH ARE IMMODEST! 101 STEPS TO BECOMING PURE AGAIN FROM THAT TIME YOU WORE LEGGINGS TO CLASS!

      • Lena Johnson

        Oh my god the notions of classical modesty are too real in this article. I cannot even

    • Halifax Steppenwulf

      Actually the uppity upper class girls also all wear leggings and tank tops… In my experience it’s uncommon to see girls of any class dressing the way she thinks is “proper.” Not many regular people, men or women, wear chinos/slacks with a nice shirt as an everyday attire when they don’t have to.

  • Emmy

    Like the other person said, I honestly thought this was satire… It just seems like the author is interested in being pretentious and degrading Black people and young girls and women. Not only that, but what exactly is this language decay you speak of? English has dialects and there is no concrete way to use language…
    Instead of roasting young girls as desperate, attention hungry beings, let’s discuss why exactly do they feel that way and let’s also imagine the possibility that they may even like how they dress. It’s funny you’re complaining about how oversexualized society is when 1) Girls dressing a certain way isn’t inherently sexual 2) Even if they were looking for attention, again, it brings up other points – like how young girls and women are always reduced to their looks, always sexualized (thanks patriarchy!), and there’s nothing wrong with needing attention or validation.
    People don’t always have access to Spearry’s and Gucci… And the Black community is absolutely always ridiculed for not adhering to the face of whiteness this author is so interested in preserving. Let’s not tip toe around this. We all know the classic profile of a thug is typically Black with sagging pants and the crude language this author hates so much. So why weren’t these details kept in mind? We saw it with Trayvon Martin, who was killed for being a young Black boy wearing a hoodie. I don’t have a doubt in my mind others have been profiled for wearing sagging pants.
    This whole article is judgemental, racist, misogynistic, classist dribble. The way you dress and talk do not make you any less of a person who deserves respect than anybody else.

  • Lena Johnson

    This is so racist I can’t even.
    Why was this even published?

  • shuathmore

    “When a friend seamlessly slips a higher-level term into everyday conversation, makes a reference of intellect it both impresses me and endears me. When a friend uses the f-bomb as an exclamatory phrase for no apparent reason, it silently pains me. ”
    Certainly true in this.

  • Lena Johnson

    Aubri Juhasz, looks like we got a republican over here

  • Lena Johnson

    This is so racist i can’t even

  • Dae

    Does this student actually go to Barnard?

    • Olivia

      Yeah, she actually goes there

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  • Alex Benson

    “Girls wear crop tops and skintight leggings in the dead of winter . . . . they project an image of insecurity and desperation for acceptance in any form. Equally at fault are their male counterparts, gone with manly chivalry . . . . It speaks volumes, depicting simply a generation of people unconcerned with little but themselves and primal petty desires.” Really? Why are you so judgmental? How does a female wearing comfortable leggings to class liken to being insecure? Or a desperation for acceptance? Or being self-absorbed? Same thing with the males.
    “Next time you unknowingly drop the f-bomb in class, do yourself a favor and take a moment to consider how many of your classmates are silently judging you.” How insecure are you? I don’t know about anybody else, but if my classmates are judging me based off of a word I offhandedly use that has no real significance, I really don’t care!

    p.s. there are several grammatical errors that shows a complete lack of editing (which is hypocritical to the extreme because you talk about “abysmal grammar”) and this is just bad writing…

  • Lana

    Wow is this satire? The author is either obviously really racist, or obviously very good at satire

  • Jawad Pullin

    This is one of the most tone-deaf articles I’ve ever read. This person really needs a reality check.