The Advent of an Initiative Bodes Well for Journalism

by / 0 Comments / 118 View / August 31, 2015

Frustration with the media is no rarity; no matter what political background and cultural views an individual may possess, there is always at least one major, influential media group that is distasteful.  Prior to the birth of social media, the means of being politically educated was dependent heavily on the lens of media agents, many whom are inarguably so embedded in the political disagreements of a time that their reporting is told through an unchangeable bias.  This isn’t a new notion by any means: the idea of bias has almost been something so synonymous with media reporting.  

The only sure response to this inherent issue with reporting is something that cannot defeat the agents of influence – arguably, nothing can remove partisanship from a world of free speech.  The aforementioned response is diversity: an amalgam of different news agents all commenting on one story, one event, one idea, one phenomenon, through a plurality of ways, perspectives, and forms, spells an improved future for the media.  Diversity in the press probably has little disadvantage; it creates a free market where individuals can benefit from more options which provides statistically more channels of truth.  Granted, the benefit of diversity is strongly impaired by the human fact that people will only believe and side with news agents that share their prior political notions.  But it does, at least, help spread ideas from groups that are otherwise overshadowed.  

The youth, namely adolescents to young adults who also deal with adult topics and issues in their daily lives, have historically the lesser influence when it comes to the media.  Young individuals often lack the voice to be read, the influence to be bought, and the credentials to be believed.  Even statistically this isn’t surprising: the opinions of a heavily credited researcher would always trump that of a young college student.  That hasn’t, however, prevented groups of students from trying to tackle the news-front amid the obvious disadvantages, ambitious to establish new frontiers for both youth and old audiences.  

One of the larger of these initiatives as of this summer has been The Young Post.  Launching tomorrow, September 1st, The Young Post aspires to grow as a media joint fixated on enabling youth voices to being heard across the globe.  Such movements are always received with general skepticism; it is difficult to attend college and school while running a serious publication.  I can also admit my own disbelief that it would succeed as fast as it has so far; my personal experiences with journalism, namely through The Undergraduate Times, has given me a sense of cynicism over new publications given the financial and operational hurdles that must be crossed.  But the Young Post, even prior to launch, has proven to execute its preparations in phenomenal style.

The East Asian Bureau of The Young Post meeting up in South Korea.

 

Well designed to the core, with an assortment of beautiful graphics corresponding its philosophy, the publication has amassed over nine thousand followers on Facebook.  Constantly sharing their steps into a soon launch, dated to begin tomorrow, the Young Post has done some remarkable work this very summer.  With endorsements from publications including India Today and JoongAng Daily, the new media joint has enjoyed a collection of warm remarks and compliments.  

The team is composed of an original group of students who met at a Yale summer seminar, later connecting to begin this project.  While they are attending different colleges across the world this coming fall, they envision that their commitments to this publication will hold firm.  The Young Post, as stated on their Facebook and during an interview, advocates for a stronger voice for young individuals by innovating the ways that news is told.  Their numbers have exceptionally grown; a small team blossoming into a writing stronghold of over 130 writers.  And while the first articles will only emerge tomorrow, the publication’s chance of succeeding is extraordinarily high, in my opinion. The execution of both marketing and recruitment has been done in a fast and polite fashion, recruiting writers from all over the world of different age groups.  There finally may, indeed, exist a publication that has a geographically symmetric presence across the world that is headed by young people.  

For now, compliments to The Young Post may be brief given their unlaunched state; however, anticipation to see what these young fellow individuals put out tomorrow is high and well deserved.  A summer of planning and strong execution spells a good fortune for this young initiative, and for college kids across the world, I can definitely advocate it is something worth looking into and following.